3.27.2015

Flora and the Penguin by Molly Idle


Two years ago I fell in love with Flora, her flippers and her fantastic dance with a flamingo. I was thrilled to learn when author and illustrator Molly Idle had a second dance - I mean book - in the works. Idle follows up the fabulous, Caldecott Honor winning Flora and the Flamingo with Flora and the Penguin

For this outing, it's wintertime and Flora has some skates to put on.
Idle adds to the story with a view under the ice, Flora's partner, piqued by curiosity, peeks out through a hole in the ice and a friendship begins!



Part of what Idle did so wonderfully in Flora and the Flamingo and again with Flora and the Penguin comes with her use of of flaps to add action to the story.



Add to this a misunderstanding between dance partners and some hurt feelings that are soon attended to and Flora and the Penguin proves a perfect partner for Flora and the FlamingoBe sure not to miss Molly Idle's interview at Seven Impossible Things and get a glimpse at how she makes the magic happen!

Books written and illustrated by Molly Idle:


Flora and the Flamingo









Books illustrated by Molly Idle:




Source: Review Copy

Telephone by Mac Barnett, illustrated by Jen Corace


Telephone, written by Mac Barnett and illustrated by Jen Corace (two of my absolute favorites) is one of those books that makes you wonder why no one has jumped on this idea before. It's also one of those deceptively simple picture books that has so much more going on.
Taking the old game that kids still love to play as inspiration, Barnett sets the story in motion when a mother pigeon asks another young, baseball bat toting cardinal to tell her son Peter to "Fly home for dinner." The message passes from bird to bird, all sitting on a telephone wire, changing with each passing. 



Sharp observers will notice that the message changes to fit the interest of the bird passing it on and listeners will be increasingly amused by the silly iterations that occur. The story peaks when a hysterical pigeon passes the message to an owl, combining all of the craziness into one long, loopy missive.







Wise and cool, the owl is unflappable. Even in the face of the pigeon's party blower, my favorite illustration. I love Corace's colorful, detailed illustrations. Besides following the message as it is passed down the wire, she includes background details that bring the message to life as well as action with the humans underneath the telephone wires, playing, reading cooking and getting ready for dinner.


Mac Barnett's stories are always paired with the best of the best when it comes to illustrators, but I hope these two work together again soon on a picture book!

Source: Review Copy